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jwhittaker
October 16th, 2013, 01:44 PM
I have a 2 page postcard template where the front is portrait(page1) and the other side(mailing panel)page2 is landscape. There is variable on both sides and the customer was to view both sides right reading.
(Page 1 vertical and page 2 rotated 90 CCW.)
I want to create the preview like this but the print pdf without the rotate.
I think I need an OnRecordStart using this code:

onlinePreviewVal = FusionPro.Composition.JobOptions.isOnlinePreview;
desktopPreviewVal = FusionPro.Composition.isPreview;

if (onlinePreviewVal == "Yes" || desktopPreviewVal == true)
code to rotate page 2 only
else
don't rotate

step
October 16th, 2013, 02:17 PM
I don't believe that FP can rotate the pages of your PDF template - only the FP frames, or resources.

I would set up a third (rotated, right-reading) page, set both back pages to unused, and turn on the appropriate page through the OnRecordStart callback:

FusionPro.Composition.SetBodyPageUsage("Rotated-back", IsPreview());
FusionPro.Composition.SetBodyPageUsage("NonRotated-back", !IsPreview());

jwhittaker
October 16th, 2013, 02:24 PM
Thanks Step
That is what I am doing but there are about 15 text boxes and 5 image boxes that have fit exactly in the right place because of the art etc.
I just takes a long time and I am having to make minute changes on both pages. This customer is making a lot of changes on that side of the template every day. I missed one of the type corrections on the print pdf. They have circles inside circles and text very close to art elements and if they are off at all you see it. I was just hoping I could use the same page to proof and to print from instead of having 2 different ones and hoping they are exactly the same.

step
October 16th, 2013, 02:48 PM
It would be ideal if you could set the back page content up as a template component and rotate it on either page depending on the value of IsPreview but I don't think that "rotate" is a property of the "template" object.

Unfortunately, I can't really think of an easy solution for that problem. But luckily for you, this forum is full of users that are much smarter than I am.

Dan Korn
October 16th, 2013, 04:36 PM
It would be ideal if you could set the back page content up as a template component and rotate it on either page depending on the value of IsPreview but I don't think that "rotate" is a property of the "template" object.

Unfortunately, I can't really think of an easy solution for that problem. But luckily for you, this forum is full of users that are much smarter than I am.
I think you should be able to call out the repeatable component (template) in a rotated text frame. But, there are some issues with runaround and such when doing this, so it might not work depending on the complexity of the page contents.

But I guess I'm wondering why you need to do this in the first place. I would think that almost any printing device or RIP would figure out that both the front and back of the postcard need to be printed at the same orientation. Or is this an imposition issue?

David Miller
October 16th, 2013, 04:48 PM
I'd do it on our RIP, but couldn't this be done during imposition via an .FPI file?

jwhittaker
October 17th, 2013, 04:24 AM
Thanks for all the responses. While still in the designing stages with this product, having to make numerous changes everyday, the final ending place for this template will be on a Marcom store. While this is going through the proofing stages with this template I am having to compose a set of sample data 3-4 times a day and then rotate every other page so our customer can read all the text right reading. This is the way they want the store to preview as well. I'll have to look into repeatable components like Dan suggested, but haven't figured out how repeatable components work yet. I'm still rookie when it comes to javascript.

Dan Korn
October 17th, 2013, 09:17 AM
While still in the designing stages with this product, having to make numerous changes everyday, the final ending place for this template will be on a Marcom store. While this is going through the proofing stages with this template I am having to compose a set of sample data 3-4 times a day and then rotate every other page so our customer can read all the text right reading. This is the way they want the store to preview as well.
That's fine, but how is the item ultimately going to be printed? I would dummy up some output with the second page landscape (for reading), and then send it to the printer/RIP, and see what happens. If it prints correctly, then you don't need to do anything else.

jwhittaker
October 17th, 2013, 09:50 AM
Dan
For the final printing both pages need to be vertical and isn't the problem. The problem is showing only the rotated page for the customer to see the variable right reading or landscape. I don't like proofing from one page and printing from another especially with a complex setup. The customer oks something that never actually prints and what prints isn't ever seen or ok'd. This is the structure for my template right now.
page 1 vertical views and prints vertical
page 2 vertical (this is for printing only doesn't show in preview)
page 3 landscape (this is only used for the preview and is shut off for final composition)
I'll attach a jpg of the template layout
Thanks Dan

Dan Korn
October 17th, 2013, 10:39 AM
For the final printing both pages need to be vertical and isn't the problem.
I don't think that's true, and I think you're missing my point. For the final printing, you should be able to provide one page portrait and the other page landscape, and most printers out there should be able to figure it out. I would at least try that before doing something complicated with extra pages.
The problem is showing only the rotated page for the customer to see the variable right reading or landscape. I don't like proofing from one page and printing from another especially with a complex setup. The customer oks something that never actually prints and what prints isn't ever seen or ok'd.
Right, so that's why I'm suggesting that not only shouldn't you do that, but that you probably don't need to.